Larisa Leonidovna Drozdova’s Elgin Marble Blog

When the Parthenon was built between 447BC and 432BC, three sets of sculptures, the metopes, the frieze and the pediments, were created to adorn it. Of these, the metopes and the frieze were part of the structure of the Parthenon itself. They were not carved first and then put in place, high up on the Parthenon, but were carved on the sides of the Parthenon itself after it had been constructed.

When the Parthenon was built between 447BC and 432BC, three sets of sculptures, the metopes, the frieze and the pediments, were created to adorn it. Of these, the metopes and the frieze were part of the structure of the Parthenon itself. They were not carved first and then put in place, high up on the Parthenon, but were carved on the sides of the Parthenon itself after it had been constructed. More

The Elgin Marbles and The Art World

What impact would the return of the Elgin Marbles have upon the Art World? 

Would this return somehow force the Vatican State to start returning to Cairo the Egyptian collection?

Would it push the Metroplolitan Museum have to concider the rightful ownership of its Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the America in its collections?  

Would Colonial age art collections have to start heading home? 

These questions go to the heart of how culture operates in a global age. And the Parthenon Frieze is now a symbol for Art-Looting. “The Greek proposal that Britain fork over Elgin’s treasures has never involved actually putting the sculptures back onto the Parthenon, which started crumbling long before he showed up. The marbles would go from one museum into another, albeit one much closer. The Greeks argue for proximity, not authenticity.” (Source)

 I would like to quote more Michael Kimmelman‘s article called Who Draws the Borders of Culture?:

Italy recently celebrated the return of a national treasure after the Metropolitan Museum gave back a sixth-century B.C. Greek krater by the painter Euphronius that tomb robbers dug up outside Rome during the 1970s. Stolen property is stolen property. But how curious that an ancient Greek vase, which centuries after it was made came into the possession of an Etruscan collector (a kind of ancient Elgin) living on what is now the outskirts of Rome, and then ended up buried for thousands of years below what became modern Italy, is today Italian cultural patrimony. By that definition, Elgin’s loot is arguably British patrimony.  

 

Navigation: Elgin Marbles And Art World (Part II)

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